The Nobel Prize 2015 Debate reaches to Stockholm

The Nobel Prize 2015 Debate reaches to Stockholm

November 1, 2015

Timeline of the Issue in Detail   5 October 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine 2015 was given to Dr Youyou Tu of China for the discovery of Artemisinin. The Nobel committee said that it is a Chinese Traditional Medicine. Nobel committee also said that the award is given for the work that underwent […]

Nobel drug for curing Malaria has Indian roots

October 11, 2015

Artemisin was known to India about 100 years ago as cited in 100 years old book titled Indian Medicinal Plants published in 1918 by Lieutenant-Colonel K.R. Kirtikar and Major B.D. Basu, which cites the use of Artemisin to cure “intermittent and remittent”, which is how malaria was known then, due to its symptoms, in 1880.

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DNA-based animal identification technique in credit dispute

February 12, 2015

A technique used globally for DNA-based identification of animal species is now at the centre of a credit dispute. Scientists at the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) in Hyderabad claim that credit for one of their patented inventions is being given to a group in Canada — a charge that the Canadian scientists say does not hold good since they use a different region of the gene in their technique.

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Ministry of External Affairs, India shares the news about the scientific contributions of Verma & Singh (2001)

December 22, 2014

In March 2001, Verma and Singh invented the “Universal primer technology” to address the question pertaining to establishment of the identity of any unknown biological sample and assign it to its known species source. This technique of CSIR-CCMB revalorized the arena of Wildlife Forensics. It is currently being used routinely in LaCONES of CSIR-CCMB to provide the wildlife forensics services to the Nation in the cases pertaining to wildlife crime.

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CSIR-Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology (CSIR-CCMB) had developed DNA barcoding technology

August 6, 2014

Press Information Bureau, Government of India, Ministry of Science & Technology:
In March 2001, Verma and Singh invented the “Universal primer technology” to address the question pertaining to establishment of the identity of any unknown biological sample and assign it to its known species source (Verma and Singh, US and PCT Patent application No: PCT/IN01/00055, First Filling Date: 28/03/2001; Priority date: 28/03/2001).

High beam Research - Universal Primer Tecchnology

Indian Inventors Discover Wildlife Identification Universal Primer

December 7, 2006

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Dec. 7, 2006 — Sunil Kumar Verma and Lalji Singh, both of Hyderabad, India, have discovered a universal primer pair for amplifying a fragment of cytochrome b gene of an animal species in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). According to the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office: “The invention provides novel universal primers that […]

Sci Dev Net Sunil Kumar Verma

Indian genetic test helps combat wildlife crimes

June 5, 2003

[NEW DELHI] Indian scientists have developed a genetic test that can distinguish between animal species, allowing for simpler identification of samples when individuals are being prosecuted for wildlife offences, and the more accurate identification of confiscated biological material.

DNA tests : A breakthrough for wildlife forensics

May 14, 2003

By WTI in New Delhi: Thanks to the synergy between bio-technology and information technology, wildlife crime investigations have now been made simpler and accurate with the introduction of DNA tests.The Hyderabad-based Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) and the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), Dehradun, have developed this first-of-its-kind procedure to identify the species […]

Times of India Sunil Kumar Verma

Checking wildlife crimes with DNA tests

May 1, 2003

HYDERABAD: Committing a crime and getting away with it may soon become a thing of the past. A new process developed by the Hyderabad-based Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) can help identify a multitude of samples in just 32 hours.

Times of India Sunil Kumar Verma

CCMB develops wildlife forensic test

April 30, 2003

In a first of its kind application of DNA fingerprinting techniques, scientists zeroed in on a DNA strand found in all living organisms and worked out a system which, in a matter of 32 hours, is able to identify the species using the minutest sample of matter. All that is required to identify a species is a tiny bit of bone, flesh or even hair, CCMB director Lalji Singh said at a press conference on Tuesday. This could also be used to test the type of meat served in hotels, he said.

The Hindu Business Line Sunil Kumar Verma News

CCMB develops DNA test to identify animal species

The new technique developed by Dr Singh and Dr S.K. Verma uses a set of novel primers to amplify the DNA from the animal species and help in quick analysis. It has the potential to replace the expensive laboratory set-ups in which the vast collections of morphological and biochemical markers of different animals are maintained to provide scientific evidence on wildlife offences at present, the CCMB Director said.

The Hindu - Sunil Kumar Verma

It’s only a leopard: lab finding

February 10, 2002

By T. Lalith Singh HYDERABAD, FEB. 9. A team of scientists from the Hyderabad-based Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) has developed a unique procedure to conclude that the carnivore which has been creating a scare at the Arignar Anna Zoological Park in Chennai is a leopard (Panthera pardus). The stray animal has been […]